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Lazarus Project

An expanded obituary project of MennObits.  Includes additional information of obituaries appearing in
The Mennonite and other newspapers.  
Source of individual obituaries given with each record.  Project managed by Thelma Martin.

Misc. Death Dates


Burkhard, Mary Yoder - 1957; . . Dohner, Addison - 1889 ; . .  Mast, Magdalena Bontrager - 1896 ; . . Miller, Anna Miller - 1926; . . Miller, Manasses M. (Rev.) - 1916 ; . . Ogburn, Lydia Ann Kauffman - 1960 ; . . Shue, Mahlon Augusta -1938 ; . . Sommer, Christian - 1897 ; . . Strite, Brenda Kay - 1958 ; . . Stutzman, George - 1916 ; . . Weaver, David - 1905 ; . .

1896
Mast, Magdalena Bontrager [(40)-June 11, 1896]


[Mast], Magdalena [Bontrager], wife of Moses E. Mast, died June 11th, 1896, and was buried in Troyer's cemetery on the 13th, in the presence of about 600 people who assembled to pay their last tribute to a departed friend. Her age was 40 yrs., 5 mon. and 12 da.

Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Benjamin Troyer, Partridge, Kan., (who
arrived here on the 12th after a week's sojourn among friends in Indiana), and David A. Troyer, of Charm.

The deceased was a member of the Amish Mennonite church; was a kind mother and a
devoted Christian. The bereaved have the sympathy of the entire community in their sad affliction. John B. Bontrager, of Logan County was among us during the funeral.

June 13th, E. N. Beachy
Sugar Creek Budget, June 16, 1896

[Note: Maiden name was Bontrager]

Submitted by: Roger Weaver


1897
Sommer, Christian
[June 11, 1846 - May 15, 1897]

CHRIST SOMMER DEAD

A Well Known Citizen Dies After a Brief Illness

Christian Sommer died at 7:30 o'clock, Saturday [May 15, 1897] morning at his home, No. 1233 South Cherry street. Surrounded by his family he passed away. His death was caused by diabetes and typhoid pneumonia after a short illness. He took to his bed just nine days ago, and despite all human efforts rapidly grew worse. The deceased was born in Perry township, Stark county on June 11, 1846. He came to Canton about fourteen years ago and resided the greater portion of this time at the corner of Charles and Cherry streets. His Spartan frame and carriage combined with his popularity earned for him the title "King of Turtletown." He was a member of the Helvetia society and of the Amish church. A devoted wife and six children survive. The latter are Mrs. Lizzie Orsinger, Miss Lena Sommer, John Christian, Jr., Edward and Jacob Sommer. Four brothers and two sisters are also living. They are Mrs. Barbara Kropf of this city, Mrs. Emma Grabill, of Richville, John Sommer, of Paris, Joseph Sommer, of Maximo, Jacob Sommer, of Missouri, and Henry Sommer, of Kansas. The funeral arrangements have not been completed.

Canton [Ohio] Repository
May 15, 1897, pg. 4, Col. 4

------------------

LAST TRIBUTE PAID

Remains of Christian Sommer Followed to the Grave by Many Friends

The funeral of the late Christian Sommer occurred from the family residence in Charles street at 9 o'clock Sunday morning. Short services were held. A double quartette from the Arion singing society sang several appropriate selections. Later services were held in Melchimer's church. The funeral was largely attended and the floral tributes were beautiful. The Helvetia society, the Liquer league and the Arion society attended the services. The remains were interred in Melchimer's cemetery.

Canton [Ohio] Repository
May 17, 1897, pg. 5, Col. 1

--------------------

CHRISTIAN SOMMERS

ONE OF CANTON'S MOST WIDELY KNOWN CITIZENS DEAD

Christian Sommers, a well known resident of the city, died at his home, No. 1233 South Cherry street at 8 o'clock this morning. Mr. Sommers was 51 years of age, having been born in Perry township, this county, June 11, 1851. He spent his early life assisting his father in the old Sommers brewery now used by the Kropf family in the manufacture of ale. Fourteen years ago he moved into the city and during most of that time he has been engaged in business at the corner of Cherry and Charles streets. He was always good-natured and jovial, and by his lavish entertainments to his innumerable friends, he acquired the soubriquet of the "King of Turtletown."

For the past two months he complained of being ill, but he did not give up until a little over a month ago, when he found that he would have to take to his bed. Physicians diagnosed his case as diabetes, and typhoid pneumonia, and did all in their power to prolong his life. It was to no avail, and this morning death conquered and the spirit of one of the best known citizans fled to the world beyond.

He leaves a widow and six children to mourn his loss. They are Mrs. Elizabeth Orsinger, Joe, Christian, Lea, Edward and Jacob Sommers, all of this city. Six brothers and sisters survive. They are: John Sommers, Minerva, Henry Sommers, Kansas; Joseph Sommers, Maximo; Mrs. Barbara Kropf, No. 223 South Walnut street, and Mrs. Emily Graybill, Richville.

Mr. Sommers was a member of the Helvetia Society, and was a member of the Amish church.

The Stark County Democrat., May 20, 1897, Page 2,

------------

Submitted by: Carol Mcshane who reports that his grave is in Eden Church Of The Brethren Cemetery, Richville, Perry Twp., Stark Co., Ohio

The above two obituaries give two different birth years. FindAGrave agrees with the 1846 birth year.

Transcribed by: Thelma Hoover Martin


1889
Dohner, Addison

Birth: Mar. 15, 1861
Death: Nov. 20, 1889

Addison Dohner, who moved back to this county from Oregon a short time ago, was instantly killed last week Wednesday, by an explosion of a steam engine on his farm six miles northwest of Peabody.

He was moving an engine, which was a traction, across a plowed field when it exploded. It threw him 150 feet, the boiler flying in all directions and much of it being carried 300 yards, while heavy traction wheels were thrown fully 200 feet.

Had the engine exploded two minutes sooner, eight or ten men would have been killed, as they were all around it and trying to help it over a piece of bad road. The funeral took place on Saturday morning. The deceased was a brother of S. S. Hoover, now of Quincy, Ill., and had been married about two years.

Peabody Gazette Herald, Nov. 25-29, 1889

Buried at Catlin Community Cemetery, Peabody, KS

Submitted & researched by: Don Stutzman

--------------------

Born in Pennsylvania to Joseph H. Dohner and Caroline Hostetter.


Research by Donald I. Good

-------------------

Wife was Fanny Hoover, daughter of Abraham Hoover, Jr. & Martha Garber from Elkhart Co., IN.

There was one daughter, Myrtle Irene, born April 8, 1888,

Research by Thelma Hoover Martin


 

1905
Weaver, David

Sept. 18, 1829-Feb. 27, 1905

Pre. David Weaver was born in Lancaster Co., Pa., Sept. 18, 1829; died near Newton, Kan., Feb. 27, 1905; aged 75 Y., 5 M., 9 D. He was married to Anna Musser, Dec. 15, 1857. To this union wore born eleven children. Two died in infancy.

Funeral held at the Pennsylvania M. H., March 1st, where a large number of friends and neighbors assembled to show their last tribute of respect. Services were conducted by T. M. Erb and D. D. Zook from Luke 23:46 and 1 Cor. 15:51-58. burial was in Eastlawn Cemetery, Zimmerdale, Harvet County, Kansas

Bro. Weaver moved with his family from Lancaster Co., Pa., to Harvey Co., Kan., in 1880 and settled on the farm where he died and which is now occupied by his son Reuben. Soon after his arrival in Kansas the first Mennonite services were held in this locality which in due time resulted in the organizing of a church now having a membership of nearly one hundred. Thus he might well be called one of the pioneers of the Mennonite church at this place. He was ordained to the ministry in the fall of 1885, but on account of throat trouble was never able to officiate very much in that capacity. His unwavering faith and loyalty to the cause he had espoused enabled him in his last days to long for the hour when he could be delivered and be at rest.

Find a Grave #27498579
Submitted by: Leon Hertzler, Newport, NH


1916
Miller, Manasses M. (Rev.)

For over 50 years he was a resident of LaGrange County, Indiana. He died at his home on Sunday night October 8, 1916 at 10 o'clock, aged 73 years, 10 months and 10 days. He was buried on the 11th funeral, which was held at his home with a large attendance.

He had been a healthy man and never had any doctor until about two years ago when he began failing in health and had been trying different kinds of medicines. All were to no avail and he gave up thinking it is not the Lord's Will for him to get well. The doctor pronounced his disease to be cancer of the stomach and for eight weeks and three days he was sick in bed, but bore all his sufferings very patiently. Funeral services were conducted by Amos Yoder, whom he mentioned and Joseph Yoder.

He was a minister of the Amish church for over 38 years and attended regularly as long as his health permitted.

He was born in Pennsylvania November 28, 1842 to bishop Moses B. and Susanna Miller. He was united in marriage to Anna Miller on March 29, 1866. She was the daughter of Christian H. and Katie Miller. From this union were born eleven children, two sons, Daniel and David and one daughter Martha preceded him into the spirits world.

Daniel, aged 3 years, 1 months and 22 days, died on August 6, 1898. David, aged 8 years, 7 months and 4 days died on February 1, 1898. Martha, aged 17 years, 4 months and 3 days died on April 1, 1898. Each were the youngest of the family when they died.

He left a sorrowing widow and children, Levi, Jacob, Samuel, Susan, Christian, Lizzie, Moses and William, Susan and Christian both living, in Kansas came in time so they could talk with father. Susan was accompanied by her husband, Rev. Christian E. Troyer of Ford County, Kansas and Christian was accompanied by his daughters Barb and Lizzie. Also attending was D.M. Yoder of Reno County Kansas, Jacob and Moses of Elkhart County, Levi, Sam, Will and Lizzie of LaGrange County.

He also left behind two brothers, Samuel of Reno County, Kansas, Daniel of Johnstown, Pennsylvania and four sisters, Mary, wife of Daniel Yoder, Tena, wife of Mr. Smith, Cassie, wife of John Lehman, all of Penna and Susie, wife of Henry Armbrust of Sugarcreek, Ohio. Mary and her daughter, Mrs. Ralph Veil were here to attend the funeral.
Name

Written on October 30, 1916 by his daughter,
Mrs. J. E. (Lizzie) Christner, Topeka, Indiana
Submitted by: Thelma Hoover Martin


 

1916
Stutzman, George


George, son of Mr. William Stutzman, was born in Arkansas County Arkansas, Jan 21, 1896, and died at his home south of Beaver Crossing, Monday Dec. 4th 1916 at the age of 20 years, 10 months and 14 days. Death was due to pneumonia.

Funeral services were held at the home Tuesday afternoon, conducted by Rev. Hagemier and the body laid to rest by the side of his mother in the Beaver Crossing Cemetery.

Beaver Crossing Times, Beaver Crossing, Nebraska
Dec. 6, 1916
Submitted by: Larry Beckler


1926
Miller, Anna Miller

She was the daughter of Christian and Katherine (Mast) Miller. She was born on June 22, 1848 and died on February 18, 1926, at the age of 77 years, 7 months and 26 days. She was married to Manasses M. Miller on March 29, 1865. He died on October 8, 1916.

To this union were born eleven children of whom three preceded her in death, two sons and one daughter. Six sons and two daughters survive, Levi, Jacob, Samuel, Christian, Moses, William, Lizzie and Susie. All her children were at the funeral except for Susie of Kansas. She was here to visit her but left for home a few days before she died.

She also left behind four brothers and two sisters, 55 grandchildren and 65 great-grandchildren. All of her grandchildren had the privilege to visit her during her sickness and also attend the funeral, except for the eleven who live in Kansas and one who lives in Fort Wayne, Indiana.

She united with the Old Order Amish Mennonite Church in 1865 and remained a faithful member to the end. She is greatly missed, especially in the home and in the church, where her place was seldom vacant as long as health permitted. Her daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. John Christner, lived with her for the last nine years. Grandmother always filled the home with cheer and sunshine. Her doors were always open to everyone and everybody was welcome ts her house. She was always willina to help the poor and unfortunate, and to visit and cheer the sick. She had a smile and kind word for everyone.

Most of her time was well and healthy and she did her own housework until about the last five years of her life, and during that time she was ailing with kidney trouble which was the cause of her death. She siffered quite a bit the last twc months, but bore it patiently. For the last. six months she had to sit in her chair most of the time day and night and often wished for the end to come.
Funeral services were conducted on February 27, 1926, at her home by Samuel Whetstone and Joseph E. Yoder. Burial was made in the cemetary nearby.

Composed by Ida Miller
Submitted by: Thelma Hoover Martin


 

1938
Shue, Mahlon Augusta

Jan. 31, 1891-Aug. 1, 1938

Mahlon Augusta Shue, 47, Biglerville electrician, school board treasurer and community leader met accidental death by electrocution while at work in the vinegar storage plant of the C. H. Musselman, company at Biglerville Monday afternoon at 4:30.

The deceased was a native of Butler township and was a son of
Samuel and Anna Mary Shank Shue, who now reside at Mummasburg. He had resided in Adams county all his life with the exception of three years he spent in Lancaster county. HE first practiced the carpentry trade and for the last 21 years was an electrician. He was widely known throughout the county and surrounding territories in that connection, having done electrical work over a wide radius about Biglerville.

Having taken an active part in community affairs for a number of years, Mr. Shue had served on the Biglerville board of education for the last 10 years and at the time of his death was treasurer of the school district. HE also was a member of the Biglerville fire company.

He belonged to the Mummasburg Mennonite church.
He is survived by his parents and his widow, the former Sue Stauffer, of Lancaster county.

Mr. And Mrs. Shue would have observed the twenty-seventh anniversary of their wedding next Monday.

Also surviving are seven children; Miss Mildred Shue, at home, a teacher in the Gettysburg public schools; Mrs. Richard Warren, Arendtsville; sterling, Rheba, Marvell, Jean and Erla Mae, all at home; one brother, Monroe G Shue, Mummasburg and two grandchildren.

Funeral services form the H. B. Bender and son funeral home at 10:00 Thursday morning with the

Revs. C.M. Ankerbrand, Waynesboro; Amos Myer, Mummasburg, and Henry W Sternat, Biglerville, officiating. Interment in the Mennonite cemetery at Mummasburg.

THE GETTYSBURG TIMES August 2, 1938
Submitted by: Leon Hertzler, Newport, NH


1957
Burkhard, Mary Yoder

February 2, 1880 - September 7, 1957

Mary Yoder Burkhard was born on February 2, 1880, in Salem Township, Champaign County, Ohio, to Rufus A. and Eri Etta (Byler) Yoder; and died at the hospital in Goshen, Indiana, on September 7, 1957, after suffering a stroke on August 25th. Her funeral was held at the Eighth Street Mennonite Church, Goshen, on September 9th. She is buried at the Prairie View Cemetery in Goshen. Her span of life was 77 years, 7 months and 5 days.

Preceding her in death were her parents, her husband, Jacob Burkhard, and one sister, Kathryn Yoder. She is survived by her three children: Esther Bauer (John) of Urbana, Ohio, Samuel Theodore Burkhard (Jean) of Worthington, Ohio, and Anna Lois McGuffin (Kenneth) of Perrysburg, Ohio; one sister, Anna Yoder of Goshen, Indiana; seven grandchildren, Andrew Burkhard Bauer (Mary Ann), Miriam Grace Bauer Hewitt (James), Walter Burkhard Bauer, James Russell Burkhard, Barbara Jean Burkhard, Mary Ann McGuffin and Margaret Jane McGuffin; and two great-grandchildren, Michael and Mary Beth Hewitt.

In 1899, Mary enrolled at the Elkhart Institute, Elkhart, Indiana, staying for one term. She then went to Chicago, serving at the Mennonite Mission there. In early 1900, there was a call from the Mennonite Church for people to go to India to help alleviate the famine in that land. A classmate at the Institute, Jacob Burkhard, contacted Mary, and after correspondence and meetings, they dedicated their hearts and lives not only in marriage, but also to go to India together to serve the starving children there. They were united in marriage on April 18, 1900, in Elkhart by Bishop John M. Shenk of Elida, Ohio. The Mennonite Evangelizing and Benevolent Board gave them certificates of appointment as missionaries in India for five years. The next months were spent in preparation, and in September they sailed from New York and reached India a month later. They spent the next six years serving at the Mennonite Orphanage at Dhamtari, Central Provinces, India, in many capacities. Her husband, Jacob, died suddenly in September 1906 of blood poisoning due to a carbuncle on his back, leaving her with three small children. She returned to America with her children in 1907. In the fall of 1908, Mary returned to India for a second missionary term until the fall of 1914. She returned to America and lived in Goshen, Indiana, until 1924, when she returned to India to serve a third term as missionary, this time under the General Conference Mennonite Board of Missions, at the station at Jagdeeshpur and the Janjgir Bible School, both in the Champa region. In 1931 she returned to America for a final time to live the remainder of her life at Goshen. She had hoped to return to India for a fourth term but her health and her mother's age kept her from going back. She, however, kept in touch with all her friends and fellow workers in both mission and in the life of the Eighth Street Mennonite Church in Goshen. In 1936 she published a biography of her husband entitled, The Life and Letters of Jacob Burkhard.

Fellow missionary, Mrs. S. T. Moyer, described Mary as follows: "She was a tall, strong woman. Her faith and love to serve were as strong and big. Her plans called for such a faith. Her vision was ever leaping forward to the future needs of a fast growing Christian church and community." In mission work she fitted right in. She entered into the arduous missionary living with glad zest and agreed gladly to push the need of better educational facilities. She could make-do with the resources at hand. She lived above self-pity or fear. Mrs. Moyer never recalled a word of complaint for restricted finances, for she gave all she could to her children in college at that time.

While in the United States, Mary was very instrumental in the formation and activities of the Mennonite Woman's Missionary Society, serving as the first president from 1916 to 1923. Elaine Sommers Rich's book, Mennonite Women, A Story of God's Faithfulness, 1683-1983, dedicated her book to the memory of ten pioneer leaders of the Society, including Mary Burkhard. At the 50th anniversary of the Society, C. S. Yoder, Past-Secretary and President of the Mennonite Board of Missions and Charities, expressed that "We all owe a debt of gratitude to Ruth Yoder, Mary Burkhard, and Mrs. M. S. Steiner, all of whom have now gone to their 'long home.' It was their courage, faith and Christian persistence that finally overcame the obstacles that were in their way and led to the establishment of your Society."

"Ready to go, ready to stay,
Ready my place to fill:
Ready for service, lowly or great,
Ready to do His will."
--A. C. Palmer

Submitted by a grandson: Walter Bauer
June 2014


1958
Strite, Brenda Kay
, 5 days, died July 11,1958 died at the Washinton County Hospital daughter of Clarence B. and Mary Grace (Clugston) Strite, Route 6 Hagerstown, Md, survived by her parents and brothers Nathan Eugene and Wilmer Lee, at home; maternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Max Clugston, Shippinsburg, Pa.; paternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Earl C. Strite, Chambersburg, Pa.; maternal great grandfather, George E. Clugston, Shippensburg, Pa. and paternal great grandmother, Mrs. Mary G. Burkholder, Maugansville, Md. Graveside services were held on Wed. July 23, 1958 at 3:30 p.m. at Chambersburg Mennonite Cemetery. Officiated by Revs. Harold Hunsecker and Omar R. Martin.

Source: The Daily Mail Hagerstown, Maryland
Tuesday, July 22, 1958
Submitted by: Leon Hertzler


1960
Ogburn, Lydia Ann Kauffman

Mrs. Lydia Ann Ogburn, 78, wife of Amos C. Ogburn, Gettysburg, R. 3, died Thursday evening [June 30, 1960] at 8:17 o'clock at the Warner Hospital where she had been animated two hours earlier. She had however, been in declining health for the last 15 years, and seriously ill the last six weeks.

A daughter of the late John J. and Martha Zook Kauffman, whe was a native of West Liberty, Ohio, who had resided in Adams County since 1936 and was a member of the Mummasburg Mennonite Church.

Survivors include her husband, whom she wed in 1902, ten children, Ira Ogburn, Aspers, Ray and Levi Ogburn, of Bladensburg, Mrs. Elvan Merrell, Greenbackville, Va, Forrest Ogburn, New Oxford, R. 2, Mrs. G. L. Hartman, Aspers, Mrs. Walter Collins, Masontown, Walter Ogburn, Guernsey; John Ogburn, Gladensburg; Earl Ogburn, Hyattsville, Md; 36 grandchildren, seven great- grandchildren, a sister, Mrs. Fannie Morningstar, Goshen, Ind, and a brother, Alpha Kauffman, Sheldon, Wis.

Funeral serviceds Sunday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock at the Mummasburg Mennonite Chruch with the Rev. Richard Danner, the Rev. Amos Meyer and the Rev. Roy Geigley officiating. Interment in the Mummasburg Cemetery. Friends may call Saturday evening 7 to 9 o'clock at the Bender Funder Home, Carlisle St. The family has asked that flowers be omitted.

The Gettysburg Times
Friday, 02 Jul 1960
Submitted by: Karen Lint


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